Law

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I chose law at Oxford for two primary reasons: first, to be taught by, and discuss with, world-leading experts, the legal processes behind stories that I saw every day in my ordinary life. Secondly, I chose law because virtually anything I wanted to do in the future (I thought I wanted to practice law when I applied but I wasn’t certain), I could do with the skills gained by the course offered here.

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p> The course is divided into two parts: Part 1, or Moderations, is made up of three modules (Roman, Constitutional and Criminal Law) with exams at the end of your second term in Oxford. Part 2, or Final Honour School, constitutes seven compulsory modules (Administrative, Tort, Contract, Trusts, Land, EU Law and Jurisprudence) as well as two options which you choose from a list of around 20. Exams in these nine papers is at the end of your degree, which means absolutely no exams in your second year. This is really important in allowing you to develop as a lawyer and do all of the other extracurricular things you want to do in Oxford. Over your second summer, you get the chance to write an extended essay (4,000-5,000 words) within the field of Jurisprudence (Theory of Law) which gives you the opportunity to develop fully an argument of your choice. As such, there is no dissertation as part of the Oxford Law course.

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p> The course is biased towards independent work with no compulsory lectures (but there are plenty put on by the Faculty which are worth attending) and one or two tutorials a week. This means that I can plan my day as I wish, leaving plenty of time of activities outside academia and relaxation. But it does involve a lot of reading! I’m on Course 1, which is three years long and entirely English law is taught. You can alternatively choose to apply to Course 2, which means you can spend your third year abroad at a European university learning that country’s law.

Oxford offers unique opportunities which you can’t get anywhere else, at the same time as giving you contact with tutors and lecturers who are not only the best people in their field but have probably written the text book every other student in the country (including you) will be using. The work is difficult and there’s lots of it, so commitment and dedication are musts, but it’s manageable and the college environment means there’s always somebody around to ask for help. At the same time, whether you want to get involved with student politics and debating, music, drama, sport, journalism or charity work, Oxford has got a lot to offer, without mentioning the bars, pubs, clubs, cinemas and restaurants to fill in any spare time. So it’s a lot of work and a lot of fun, and the rewards are immense. I would thoroughly recommend applying.